Camimade patterns

Earlier this year I met Camille of Camimade patterns.

‘Camimade is an independent sewing pattern company, designing minimalist and timeless sewing patterns, on the lookout for a more contemporary sewing.’

Clairesews had organised a fabric shopping day at Goldhawk Road while I was visiting London and that’s where I met Camille. Thank you Claire for a wonderful day/s as we did venture to the V&A Museum the following week.

Back to the Camimade story.

Cami was looking at gorgeous silks as we were fabric shopping and it was only after I started to follow her instagram account that I saw how lovely her designs were. Then there was the call out to pattern test so I agreed to pattern test.

Feuillage: shirt and shirt dress pattern:

This is a relaxed style pattern and it’s versatile – shirt or shirt dress option.

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Here’s the shirt flat lay style.

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What you can clearly see is the finishing details of the split sleeve. During testing Cami made some adjustments to the pattern and it now fits together easily.

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I made both the feulliage shirt to go with the Ecorce pants. Go to Cami’s website to see her beautiful photos. She looks stunning in these pieces.

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My photos are my usual look. Nothing special but super comfortable.

The front vents in the shirt version I made are best left closed. That’s my personal preference. When I wore this shirt with the front vents open I didn’t feel comfortable. Now I do with the front vents closed. I added a strip of black powermesh to sew these vents shut. Powermesh doesn’t fray so it was a good fabric choice.

Ecorce: Trousers and capri pants

This pattern is high waist and semi-fitted – perfect for humid Summer days in Sydney.

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These are super easy to wear and a bit bigger than I should wear because I lost some weight at the time. The winter weight loss was intentional.

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Oh my goodness the back vent at the hem is awesome. Maybe because it makes these super easy to wear from a practical point of view.

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The fabric I’ve used is very stiff hence the bulges you can see on this side view photo. This was a test version and I wear these pants for housework. The wearable toiles do get used.

What I love about these trousers are the leg shaping. There is room for my cyclist thighs to I don’t have to make any further fit adjustments.

 

The usual pattern adjustments I did make was to lower the back crotch and shorten the front crotch. That’s just how I’m shaped and I’m so pleased I learnt how to make these changes.

Once I tried these on again after losing a few kilos, I unpicked the waistband and easily took out the fullness that I had gained during the Winter months. That’s what made me realise this is a good pants pattern to have when your weight fluctuates so much. The seamlines are great for sizing this pattern up or down.

 

Shirt or blouse?

When is a blouse not a shirt? Uhm. I’m not too sure but I can say this shirt/blouse got me through PR’s Sewing Bee for Round 1.
Can you see the stress on my face? I avoid contests where possible.

This fabric from White Tree Fabrics UK, was originally earmarked for a wrap blouse, until Round 1 was announced. So I put the brakes on that project and grabbed McCalls 5433 and decided on making View A with all the sleeve bells and whistles of Views B/D.

I was really, really lucky MyHung Parramatta had matching buttons.
What was my challenge?
  •   Picking the style for this fabric
  •   Using the fabric to highlight its print
  •   Not this shirt look like a PJ shirt
  •   Making it fit me again
  •   Picking the seam finishes because this shirt is going to be inspected inside and out!

I’ve been working with Liberty prints lately so I cut out each body pieces separately and tried to match the print lines. They run diagonally.

Top Left clockwise: buttons on cuff; collar on shirt; two part collar; cutting front bodice

However there’s a button tab so I decided to cut this piece a wee bit longer to accommodate matching or not matching the print. My plan was to place the shirt buttons on the flowers of the print.


So technically, this is a shirt.  But I still can’t tell you when a blouse is not a shirt.
An inside view
The inside of the back.

The seams are French seams. I machine felled the sleeve seam allowances to the shirt.

The collar, collar band, button tabs, cuffs and sleeve band are interfaced.
This progress shot showed me I was on the right pattern placement track.

Fit adjustments

Roll shoulder on the shoulder seams and sleeve curve. I left the sleeve length long so I can roll it up to bracelet length when I need to.
This already had a centre back seam to accommodate my sway back.


To make sure I could size this up at the hips, I cut a 12 at the hips.

A back view shot for fit.

Long story short, once I finished this shirt and took the photos I wore the shirt the next day at work. Well I felt it was too loose at the front, I before work I sewed the front dart in by 1cm and it fit a whole lot better but there were no ripples.

So I tried to smile but ‘sheesh’, this is stressful.

The ladies at work love my shirt. The roll up sleeves were just what I needed to work at my desk and I did not dirty my sleeves. I hate cleaning cuffs on business shirts and I don’t intend on ruining this shirt simply because I love wearing it.

Sue and Yoshimi got through to Round 2 with over 40 others who burnt the candle at both ends to get through. There were 116 of us who were judged in Round 1.

Tech post – McCalls 6898

An unassuming shirt can be turned into any look you want. So I chose McCalls 6898 that the lovely Lynelle bought for me on her trip to Sydney this year. I couldn’t let this pattern sit there for too long and gather dust.

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 From the line drawing, I liked the waist shaping.

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And I fell for this floral print to get me into Spring. It’s very English to me.

Cotton print from Minerva Crafts
The reds and blues are on a cream background. The fabric is a lovely shirt-weight and irons nicely. You should see how nicely the french seams look too.
Pleats not gathers
There are gathers on the lower shirt pieces and on the sleeves. I opted for pleats.
Shortened lower pieces
Petite points
Sometimes I simply take off the length at the hem. This time I decided to take off the length at the hip level because I wanted to keep the shaping. So the length came off just under the notch point.
Shortening the sleeve

Again, I took the length off under the 3/4 sleeve hem to keep the shaping at the cuff.


This actual shirt – you’ll see it later this week.

Spring shirt – McCalls 5433

This blouse is sitting on top of its sister shirt dress.
Most of my tops are knits and now I’ve gone back to making blouses using wovens and adding sewing techniques I’ve learnt y’all in the online sewing community and Peggy Sagers webcasts. She’s been doing free sewing webcast since December 2010 and I sew my collars using her method.
I still wear my green skinny jeans a lot.

This blouse has cap sleeves from Butterick 5328 but they were widened to sit out from my shoulders.


Butterick 5328 cap sleeve version

The cap sleeves on this blouse was tight fitting but not anymore. I’ve used french seam finishes and bias binding on the sleeve seams.

‘How do you do’ pose.

Did I tell you this fabric has a 2-way print? There was a two-way arrow sticker on the fabric and I couldn’t tell which was the right way on this print no matter which way I looked the fabric.

The nice thing about this pattern is that it has the dress extension on the main pattern pieces so you don’t have to cut out two bodices for the dress and the shirt versions. Thanks for asking the question Rebecca. I’m flattered when I see others pick up ideas that I’ve used. I pick up ideas from sewing bloggers all the time.

Resisting fairy floss at the Easter Show.

You should see all the great fitted blouse entries on Pattern Review! This is the final week of the contest that I’m managing. The contest closes on 31 March.

This view convinced me that I need to shorten the blouse and I have. See below. I took it up by 3cm.


I’ve now entered this blouse into Faye’s 2013 essential top sew along.

The story about these Purple Pins is to come…

Spring shirtdress – McCalls 5433

This print fabric has strong colours and reminded me of the orchids in Singapore. I bought the fabric locally and it was the first shirt dress I made this month, before the vintage military dress.

Shirtdress:
This blue work version made earlier is worn to work (a lot) so I had to make it again. The original plan was to simply make just the shirt.

Well, I ended up making this floral dress instead. What can I say. My planning skills are fluid.

This little floral number was lined with stash fabric and because the lining peeks through at the collar, I added a super quick facing from leftover floral fabric.


 














The close up shot below shows a hint of flowers on the inside at the neckline. The last minute facing worked. Every seam is either french seamed or self-made bias bound. And I added the purple bias for colour and a vertical line. We petites know why.
Notice the cap sleeves. This sleeve pattern was traced from Butterick 5328. When I originally used this cap sleeve, it was tight so I widened it by 2.5cm for more movement.
Here’s a ‘lean against the wall’ shot. The cap sleeve does peek over my shoulders – just as I wanted. It’s really cool to wear on hot days.

And the ‘yes it covers my caboose’ shot – not flattering. Back to the gym I go.

 
There is a shirt version in this fabric but I’m working on the deep purple skinny jeans to go with it. That might sound like tos much colour but you can let me know when I show you the final ensemble.