Jackie: roll shoulder adjustment

Jackie has raglan sleeves and I still need to make a roll shoulder adjustment so let me show you how.

The adjustment above is from my adjustment reference book: Fitting and pattern alterations: A multi-method approach to the art of style selection, fitting and alteration by E. Liechty, J. Rasband and D. Pottberg-Steineckert. Expensive book to buy but used a lot. 

In the photo above, the red marks above show where to add room at the seam line and where to cut hinges to do this. The cross marks indicate where you take room out at the seam line.
Above is my crude way of doing this. So I added 1.5cm for the back seams on the back piece and back seam on the sleeve and then excess removed from the front seams (1.5cm) using hinges.
That’s all I needed to change for a roll shoulder on a raglan sleeve.
And as we head into the weekend, here’s what Janelle, Lena and I have covered.
Printing your pattern. 

I bet you’ve already finished your Jackie just in time for the cold spell we’re having right now.

New knit dress – M5752

Yesterday was a good day sewing, hosted by Sharon (thanks Sharon).

Our weather is still warm but not humid anymore, and it’s autumn. This knit dress is a Palmer/Pletsch classic fit that has some really good reviews on Pattern Review, so I used this blue printed knit bought at Lincraft (50% off) in February ($6).

I didn’t try to match the print because this is a toile dress. As you can see below, I used a dark blue fabric as the midriff stay. The midriff gathers requires two layers over the midriff stay, so i only used one layers of gathers.

Now that I’m getting more practice at adjusting patterns, I will keep ploughing through the new patterns I bought last year. The great feaure in this pattern is there is a whole section dedicated to adjusting this pattern. Bonus for anyone who is making this up without any help or reference material.
Lots of the previous reviews mentioned the fact that as some points, you are sewing through more than six layers of fabric. The reason for this is that the front piece doubles onto itself, so the picture above shows where I’m cutting the pattern back, so there’s less bulk in the front bodice.
The midriff gathers also requires two layers over the midriff stay, so I only used one layers of gathers.

So this dress has:
– sway back adjustment

– dropped the back skirt hem to cover my rear
– full bust adjustment – c cup
– roll shoulder (2 cm)

– waist adjustment to fit the size 12 for my waist.

I’ve also made the short sleeve version in a zebra knit now.

Black wrap top – butterick 5328

Here’s one of my tops for my dark swap.

The fabric is from Pitt Trading and for a cotton it’s quiet fragile.

The embroidery border is only placed on the front panel and I’ve matched it on both left and right panels. I’ve used black buttons instead of ties to keep the shirt on, rather than have it slip off.

I’ve also added detail on the sleeve hem to keep focus towards my face instead of at my hips. The sleeve gathers were also added to create the illusion of a waistline – ha.

I took out the excess fullness in the back by adding in another dart, rather than take the vent any further. The top does have a swap back adjustment, rolled shoulder adjectment, full bust adjustment and additional fiddling with the front gathers to have them where the fullness is needed.

Reality adjustments

Here are the other two tops I am making up for my SWAP.

Butterick 5283 is the one I’ve just done twice (spots and grey).
This fabric below has different properties to the other two.
I like the colour of this fabric because it goes with my darkness theme. I wore the grey one top to work and it was comfortable and looked good, so I know this is top is a keeper.



Diary of a sewing fanatic raised some good points about how to SWAP. They were points that I could understand.

I don’t have a storyboard, I just have a theme.

The pattern below is a new pattern so I’ve got the energy to adjust it to work for me. The fabric didn’t cost much but it’s dark but can be matched to other items in my wardrobe.

Life’s too short to make ill-fitting clothes.

In knots – Butterick 5283

This pattern is doing my head in.

I made this top last week with spotted fabric and sleeveless. This time I’ve used a comfortable knit that has one way stretch and good memory. I’ve also only cut out one front piece, so this is not self faced. That saved me a bit of fabric but also made the top hang nicely without making me feel chunky.

I traced off the original outline under the chest and then dropped it by 3inches. The pencil on the pattern shows you how far I’ve moved the piece down.

The front now is looks very gathered because of the knot so I can live with it. As the sleeveless version hangs over the shoulders, I had to take 4cm off the shoulder seams to bring the sleeves back to my shoulders instead of down my arms. Did you notice that the twist is on the same side as the pattern drawing?

I took out the centre back fold so the back fits better. There’s still some work to do here as my right hips is higher than my left hip. This pattern could be another top that gets lengthened into a dress soon.

PS. The skirt is one that I made 4 years ago and I work it to work last week. It still fits, but it didn’t look like me so I’ve added a trim to make it fit into my current wardrobe look.

The beginnings of a set – Kwik Sew 3378

This was a quick top to make at our sewing weekend, with one hitch. I cut out the small size and not the medium size. The view above shows the extra piece I added to the side seams.


When I wore it as a small, my tummy rolls where there for all to stare at. OMG. What was I thinking.

The additional side pieces can’t easily be seen and the original suggestion to add the extra as ruching made me feel more self conscious about my rolls, so the top sits flat on my body. Phew. This is another piece that I bought when we were in Melbourne fabric shopping. The rest of the fabric will be made into a cardie.

It’s green – Butterick 5277

At our sewing weekend last week I spent much of my time on Saturday, trying to figure out why the neckline wasn’t sitting right. After whizzing the sleeves in, I had lunch and then as my blood sugar levels were refreshed, I saw that the sleeves were in the wrong way. I didn’t check where the neckline edge and sleeve hem edge were.

After what seemed like a good hour, I unpicked the sleeves and resewed them into the dress again. Did I mention that I’d done the same mistake to the lining? Yes it was painful, but I keep relearning that perseverance keeps me sewing.

At some point, I’ll transfer the marks from the pattern to the fabric so I don’t keep making the same mistake again.

The roll collar got lots of good comments from my sewing buddies and my work collegues but I realise that I need to make some quirky work so that my wardrobe doesn’t become boring.

I do have enough fabric in my stash to do a few challenging pieces and they are now on my sewing radar.

I will make this dress up again but without the collar in a patterned fabric. The neckline is a bit too wide to wear comfortably without feeling ‘showy’ so I’ll bring the neckline in by 1.5cm, add a contracting trim and see how it feels. Our weather is hot enough that wearing a sleeveless dress in the office with a light ‘cardy’ is acceptable.