My first Marcy Tilton – Vogue 8982

Marcy Tilton patterns are unique. I’ve shied away from them because they’re not really fitted. I like fitted clothes. The challenge here was to give add some shape with this pattern Vogue 8982.

I just love the piecing on this jacket. Remember that faux leather jacket with its piecing?
McCalls 6292

I still want to make this in real leather…one day. But Spring is here so the prospect of my making a leather jacket this year is diminishing. That doesn’t mean it’s not on the cards next year.

ChesneyCat and SarahLiz have made Vogue 8982 as have a few PR sewists. The buttons variations are a key feature that made me wonder what buttons I’d use with this jacket.

On this test version, I’ve used hooks because the fabric is so detailed. I was given 10m of this fabric from a colleague years ago so I use it for toiles in the hope of making it wearable. So if it doesn’t work, I’m ok with that.


On my knit version, I’ve used buttons. Three buttons. These buttons were made by the lovely Lynnelle from yousewgirl. I’ve sewn on these buttons and used hooks and eyes as the closure until I was happy with the button placement. So I wore this jacket to work so I gave myself a whole day to figure it out. 

These knits are from Pitt Trading. They’re so soft; wash well; easy to sew; don’t unravel.
This version have the shoulder seams totally moved forward. On the previous version, the shoulder seams rolled forward at the shoulder point only. This version sits much better on me.

This little jacket was sewn up in 2 hours. The time to sort out the button placement took a whole day. 

I still love to wear a great fitting jacket and I’ll use this knit version as a cardi-jacket TNT.
You could go ballistic and use different fabrics and trims all over this jacket if that’s your style. I’ll certainly do an FBA on the next version:)

25 comments

  1. There's definitely a little “something” about Tilton patterns! They've grown on me 🙂 really like this on you, especially the color blocking

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  2. One of the greatest things about the sewing blogging community is seeing patterns made up by others. Your jacket is great Maria! I would have passed this one up before seeing yours as well. Lovely!!

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  3. I have this pattern too but like you, I prefer fitted garments. I like your little knit version with the 3 buttons – very cute! I may have to give this a try.

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  4. I love that you made this with a knit. This pattern is on my to sew list and you're wonderful version has made me want to move it up the list! Can't wait to see what you do with it next.

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  5. A cardy jacket is the way to go – this is not a structured jacket, which is part of it's appeal. Like you, most of the Tilton's I find just too loose and not big on shape – but great for more relaxed wear. I agree, these would work with embellishment, which is what the Tilton's do seem to be big on. And it certainly works when you are short on time and want a quick fix. There is a place for fitted and unfitted garments in a wardrobe, although like you I prefer fitted jackets. Middle age shapes need a bit of help 🙂

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  6. The Tilton's patterns are not usually my cup of tea either. Too loose for my taste but that jacket is quite nice and after seeing Sarah Liz's and your versions I'm feeling differently about it. You definitely need to see it made up and worn by a real person to appreciate it. I like the colour blocking.

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  7. I'm quite impressed that the pattern is for both knits and wovens! Both of yours are lovely and I can see them being worn a lot.

    Do you think the woven one would lend itself to being lined?

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  8. Now it was your version that got me interested in this pattern. As long as it's the right length, fits at the shoulders and is the length that makes you feel comfortable, I think cardy jackets have a place when you're in aircon all day.

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  9. I think you could line the woven version. I need to tweak the fit.
    The fabric I used should have been woven because of the embroidery bits on the back of the fabric.

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