Equestrian aspiration

For my Minerva projects I decided on an equestrian theme so the riding pants were a must with last month’s riding jacket. Then reality set in and a ‘quirky work skirt’ came to mind.

I’ve made pants before but for a riding outfit, sleek pants are a must so I’ve used a double knit that has no stretch and McCalls 6404.

Equestrian riding pants

While the pants pattern is drafted for fabric with 4% stretch, it made sense to trial the pattern in a similar double knit fabric. After some tweaks, I used the partial medium hip measure and a variation of small sizing along the legs.

Riding outfit inspiration

McCalls 6404 offers 4 legging styles and I used view D.

So after trialling this pattern in another double knit, I was able to make this pair fit quite nicely.

I can walk, sit and bend in these pants, which I wouldn’t have been able to do if the fabric was a medium-weight woven fabric. This double knit is perfect for my equestrian idea.

Now to find ‘that horse’ to go with this outfit.

Quirky work skirt

Blackwatch tartan is the same fabric used for my senior school uniform jacket so I had to make a Winter skirt with a twist, or a couple of Vivienne Westwood inspired pleats.
Vivienne Westwood Anglomania skirt
I was tempted to kilt this fabric up but maths isn’t my strong point so I didn’t want to waste this gorgeous tartan.



So my decisions then became: one pleat for two? And do I include one pleat along the back?


I decided to place two pleats at the front and keep the back plain. So I used McCalls 9356 as my basic skirt pattern and matched up the plaids at centre back and along the flat side seam.


I placed the front pattern where I wanted the pleats to be placed.

Then I lined up the back skirt piece to the flat side seam to match the plaids.


I had to match the lines along the centre back zipper seam.

So my decision was to figure out how to keep the front pleats in place…hand stitching.

 I hand stitched the pleat folds to the underside of the fabric.


They’ve stayed in place. 
The waistband plaids match the centre front skirt lines only.


The back and side seam lines match. You’ll notice the hem is lower at centre back. That’s my standard back hemline.


And I wanted to show you the zipper and waistband matching. I hand sewed the waistband for accuracy. The lining is light-weight but strong wearing and easy to iron.

So here’s the quirky skirt with its jacket – all safely ironed too.


There was really no need to put a pleat on the back of this skirt.


I’ve worn this skirt to work a few times and it’s really lovely to wear.


Thank you Minerva Crafts UK for these fabrics and notions. I’ve got a new Winter work outfit that’s already been worn quite a bit this month.

And lots of joy and happiness to Vicki and Richard on your upcoming wedding. If you love seeing wedding sewing as it happens, Annette has been blogging all of her wedding sewing for Vicki on the Minerva Craft blog page. I’m in awe of Annette’s work.
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Jacket fav: Vogue 8931

Finally. I found a jacket style I like and a pattern I have already fitted (Vogue 8931) for this month’s Minerva Crafts project. This French crepe and buttons worked together well. The fabric is soft, resilient and was a confidence builder. 

These buttons in two different sizes take this jacket from ordinary to being ‘just a bit different’. My idea was to take ‘ordinary’ navy to a more interesting look.


My wardrobe plan is to have a work jacket for this dress too.

The purple jacket gets worn regularly in the office and the shape has held up really well. I’ve worn this jacket for over a year so I know the fit works. This time I’ve made the 3-button version with the buttons ‘on show’ and adding ‘real’ pockets. I went for a riding jacket style.

The jacket


So here’s the new jacket with my highland inspired dress looking ‘highland-like’. Ok, I’ll stop smiling now.


Here’s how the new jacket looks up close and I’ve blued up the colour so you can see the contrasts.

I still can’t believe my piping worked. It really did.

I always get my jackets and coats professionally pressed once they’re made.

Here are the main areas where a deep breath and a calm atmosphere helped me along the way.

Pockets

I used the pocket pieces from Vogue 8732, because that’s what I had available to me. The welts were made thinner.

I’ve used a contrasting thread to guide my sewing.

Here’s the underside that I have to contend with.

Below is the corner pocket stitching that keeps the pocket square.

I call these two happy smiling pockets.

Facing detailing

This is something I enjoy doing as my signature detailing.
I also felt I needed to use the navy ribbon I had order for the highland dress but didn’t use.

Collar notches

Now this isn’t the collar technique I used. I followed the instructions and below is my checking to make sure they matched.

Sleeves

I don’t usually handstitch along the sleeve stitching line but this time I did to make sure the sleeve was puckerless. This crepe is beautiful and very pliable.

Buttonholes

These are the markings I made to make sure the buttonholes all started and finished in the same place.


I love these buttons.

So you could say I love this jacket style and it goes with a few pieces I already have in my wardrobe. I could use this jacket as a riding jacket, and I’ll show you what I mean in July.

Thanks again to Minerva Crafts for supplying everything to make this riding jacket.

Now this jacket is a work staple.
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